Song of the Day #3,276: ‘For Emily, Wherever I May Find Her’ – Simon & Garfunkel vs. Prince

This might be the most incongruous matchup of Montauk Madness’ second round — the gentle acoustic folk rock of Simon & Garfunkel against the hyper-sexual experimental funk of Prince.

Simon & Garfunkel made it here by eliminating Rufus Wainwright rather easily, with 80% of the vote. Prince had an even simpler path, picking up 91% against Squeeze. I imagine they’ll both have a harder time in this round, though I don’t have a ready prediction as to who will win. Continue reading

Song of the Day #1,185: ‘The Dangling Conversation’ – Simon & Garfunkel

The third single from Parsely, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme might not have the instant familiarity of ‘Scarborough Fair’ and ‘Homeward Bound’ but it is a dazzler nonetheless.

‘The Dangling Conversation’ sets a sad scene of the relationship that has dissolved into apathy. Simon, all of 25 years old when he wrote this, beautifully captures the numbness of faded love.

You can picture these two intellectuals, “couched in… indifference,” reading their poetry and having superficial conversations about analysis and the theater — this is 70s Woody Allen territory a decade earlier.

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Song of the Day #1,184: ‘Homeward Bound’ – Simon & Garfunkel

Simon & Garfunkel’s third album, Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme, was recorded and released in 1966, the same year that Sounds of Silence introduced their sound to a large audience.

The new album, their third, was even more successful than its predecessor, achieving triple platinum status and sending three singles up the charts.

One was the duo’s rendition of the classic folk tune ‘Scarborough Fair,’ blended with a counter melody inspired by Simon’s solo track ‘The Side of a Hill.’

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Song of the Day #502: ‘Scarborough Fair/Canticle’ – Simon & Garfunkel

I once came up with a scientific formula to numerially rank every CD in my collection. The idea was to assign a point value (on a scale of 1-10) to each song on each album and then divide by the number of songs on the album. This would give you a mean song-score for the whole album… basic stuff.

The added wrinkle came when I tried to account for longevity. I figured it would be easy to overpraise more recent songs while a song that stood the test of time would get no boost for having done so. So I weighted the scores by adding a tenth of a point for every year since each album’s original release.

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