Song of the Day #4,614: ‘Please Be Patient With Me’ – Wilco

Wilco’s 2007 Sky Blue Sky, the band’s sixth album, is a mellow affair. As such, I should really give it another try. I’m a big fan of Wilco’s first four albums but never got into 2004’s A Ghost is Born for some reason. I bought this one out of habit but didn’t pay much attention to it at the time.

Hearing today’s random SOTD has me regretting that. This is a lovely acoustic song, very reminiscent of Elliott Smith, and exactly the kind of thing I enjoy from Jeff Tweedy and Wilco.

Tweedy made an interesting comment about this album’s retreat from the studio trickery employed (quite successfully) on the band’s celebrated 2001 album Yankee Hotel Foxtrot.

He said, “I got nervous about the technology on Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. If you need a certain amp or pedal to make a song what it is, it isn’t a song.”

I see his point, though I can think of many great songs that owe a great deal to their production. The Beatles, for example, revolutionized the ways you can build a song in the studio. Of course, most Beatles songs work just as well given a treatment like this.

[Verse 1]
I should warn you
When I’m not well
I can’t tell
Oh, there’s nothing I can do
To make this easier for you

[Refrain]
You’re going to need to be patient with me

[Verse 2]
I’m this apple, this happening stone
When I’m alone
Oh, but my blessings get so blurred
At the sound of your words

[Refrain]
I’m gonna need you to be patient with me

[Verse 3]
How can I warn you when my tongue turns to dust
Like we’ve discussed
It doesn’t mean that I don’t care
It means I’m partially there

[Refrain]
You’re going to need to be patient with me

2 thoughts on “Song of the Day #4,614: ‘Please Be Patient With Me’ – Wilco

  1. Dana Gallup says:

    I think the key word there is “need.” If a stripped down version of a song reveals it to be thread bare, covering that up with layers of production and technology is a bit like adding all sorts of ingredients to a chuck steak. Sure, the meal might taste good, but it will never be as good as starting with sirloin.

  2. andrea katz says:

    How insightful and charming…loved this!

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