Song of the Day #3,122: ‘I Can’t Give Everything Away’ – David Bowie

bowie_blackstar2016 was the year we lost David Bowie, and so many other legendary entertainers.

But it was also the year I truly discovered Bowie. His death, just days after the release of his final album, Blackstar, prompted me to dive into his catalog and buy more than a dozen of his most-revered albums. I chronicled the process here on the blog.

It was a sad reason to take that leap into Bowie’s incredible discography, but I’m so grateful that I did. He was a towering, innovative artist whose work influenced songwriters decades after he recorded it and will continue to do so decades after his death.

Blackstar is an emotional listen when you consider that Bowie must have known he was dying when writing and recording it. So many lines on the album take on a new meaning in light of his death. THat’s especially true of today’s SOTD, the final song on the final release of Bowie’s career.

[Verse 1]
I know something is very wrong
The pulse returns the prodigal sons
The blackout hearts, the flowered news
With skull designs upon my shoes

[Chorus]
I can’t give everything
I can’t give everything
Away
I can’t give everything
Away

[Verse 2]
Seeing more and feeling less
Saying no but meaning yes
This is all I ever meant
That’s the message that I sent

[Chorus]
I can’t give everything
I can’t give everything
Away
I can’t give everything
Away
I can’t give everything
I can’t give everything
Away
I can’t give everything
Away

[Verse 1]
I know something is very wrong
The pulse returns the prodigal sons
The blackout hearts, the flowered news
With skull designs upon my shoes

[Chorus]
I can’t give everything
I can’t give everything
Away
I can’t give everything
Away
I can’t give everything
I can’t give everything
Away
I can’t give everything
Away

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One thought on “Song of the Day #3,122: ‘I Can’t Give Everything Away’ – David Bowie

  1. Dana says:

    I can’t imagine writing and recording these songs knowing your death is immininant, but I suppose it is a tradition of genius musicians dating back to Mozart.

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