Song of the Day #4,451: ‘Good Morning’ – Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds and Donald O’Connor

Continuing my personal ranking of the 25 movie musicals deemed essential by the American Film Institute…

#4. The Sound of Music – 1965
(#4 on the AFI list)

My biggest blind spot going into this project. I wrote about my newfound love for The Sound of Music when I kicked off this series back in June.

#3. Meet Me in St. Louis – 1945
(#10 on the AFI list)

My biggest surprise. I knew next to nothing about this beautiful film before watching it, except that it featured one of my all-time favorite songs, ‘Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.’ Now it’s one of my favorite musicals.

#2. Singin’ in the Rain – 1952
(#1 on the AFI list)

Considered by many, including AFI, as the greatest musical of all time, Singin’ in the Rain is a stone-cold classic that’s completely deserving of that status.

Directed by Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen, this breezy look at the impact of “talkies” on 1920s Hollywood is as charming and entertaining today as it must have been in the early 50s.

In addition to the beloved title scene, one of the most iconic movie moments, Singin’ in the Rain features a number of wonderful musical set pieces: Donald O’Connor’s acrobatic ‘Make ‘Em Laugh,’ Debbie Reynolds’ cake-bursting ‘All I Do is Dream of You,’ the tongue-twisting ‘Moses Supposes,’ and my personal favorite, ‘Good Morning.’

My wife and I used to play this video for our first daughter and it never failed to lift her spirits (and ours).

Just about all of the songs in Singin’ in the Rain had previously appeared in other films. Producer Arthur Freed conceived of this movie as a showcase for songs he had co-written for earlier productions. It’s a testament to the movie’s greatness that it’s hard to picture these tunes in any other context.

Though Singin’ in the Rain is now considered one of the greatest films of any genre, it was nominated for only two Academy Awards and won neither. The film’s score was recognized, as well as the brilliant supporting performance by Jean Hagen as Lina Lamont, a silent film star whose grating voice makes her a liability once the microphones are turned on.

Good mornin’, good mornin’
We’ve talked the whole night through
Good mornin’, good mornin’ to you
Good mornin’, good mornin’
It’s great to stay up late
Good mornin’, good mornin’ to you

When the band began to play
The stars were shining bright
Now the milkman’s on his way
It’s too late to say, “Good night”

So, good mornin’, good mornin’
Sun beams will soon smile through
Good mornin’, good mornin’
To you and you and you and you
Good mornin’, good mornin’
We’ve gabbed the whole night through
Good mornin’, good mornin’ to you

Nothin’ could be grander than to be in Louisiana
In the mornin’, in the morning
It’s great to stay up late
Good mornin’, good mornin’ to you
It might be just a zippy if we was in Mississippi

When we left the movie show, the future wasn’t bright
But tame is gone, show goes on
And I don’t wanna say good night
So say, “Good mornin'”, good mornin’
Rainbow is shinin’ through
Good mornin’, good mornin’

Bonjour!
Monsieur!
Buenos días!
Muchas frías!
Buon giorno!
A ritorno!
Guten morgen!
Guten morgen!

Good mornin’ to you!

3 thoughts on “Song of the Day #4,451: ‘Good Morning’ – Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds and Donald O’Connor

  1. Dana Gallup says:

    Definitely a classic! Surprised it didn’t get more Oscar love.

  2. Peg says:

    I agree it should have received more Oscar Love ❤️

  3. Amy says:

    We saw this in a theater several years ago, where an organ was center stage until it was movie showtime. A perfect old theater to watch this classic. I am surprised to learn the songs weren’t written for the film, and I admit that does take ever so slightly from it.

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