Song of the Day #3,886: ‘You’re Not Drinking Enough’ – Don Henley

Here’s a track from Don Henley’s 1984 album Building the Perfect Beast, best known for opening track (and bona fide classic) ‘The Boys of Summer.’

That song was written by Henley and Mike Campbell, but all but one other song on the album was written or co-written by Danny Kortchmar, a frequent collaborator of Henley’s. Kortchmar has the sole writing credit on today’s SOTD. He also co-wrote most of the tracks on Henley’s 1989 follow-up, The End of the Innocence.

I admire those prolific songwriters who never get their face on an album but write heaps of material with or for other artists. They are respected in their industry, I’m sure they pull in a shit-ton of money, and they don’t have to deal with the downside of fame. I think I’d prefer that career to one in the spotlight.

I can see that you haven’t recovered from the girl who let you down
And you’d sell what is left of your soul for another go-round
You keep telling yourself she means nothing and maybe you should call her bluff
But you don’t really believe it
You must not be drinkin’ enough

Well, the perfume she wore you can buy down at the Five & Dime
But on some other woman it don’t smell the same in your mind
You keep telling yourself you can take it-
Telling yourself that you’re tough
But you still wanna hold her
You must not be drinkin’ enough
You’r not drinkin’ enough to wash away old memories
And there ain’t enough whiskey in Texas to keep you from beggin’, Please
Please, please

She passed on your passion and stepped on your pride
Turns out you ain’t quite so tough
Cause you still wanna hold her
You must not be drinkin’ enough

Ay-yl-yl-yl
Ask yourself why
You still wanna hold her
You must not be drinkin’ enough
Ay-yl-yl-yl etc

One thought on “Song of the Day #3,886: ‘You’re Not Drinking Enough’ – Don Henley

  1. Dana Gallup says:

    I’m not sure if you were aware of this, but “Boys of Summer” was originally written by Mike Campbell for Tom Petty, but Petty rejected it. Henley had the good sense to recognize a classic in the making.

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