Song of the Day #1,859: ‘See You On the Moon’ – Tift Merritt

seeyouonthemoon#9 – See You On the Moon – Tift Merritt

I ranked Tift Merritt’s fourth album, See You On the Moon, at #3 on my 2009 year-end list, and now it’s one of two albums from that year to make this list.

The album it leap-frogged is Elvis Costello’s National Ransom, a fine record indeed but not one I find myself returning to often.

I’m tempted to name this the finest of Merritt’s five albums, though it’s a stiff competition. Her sophomore release, 2004’s Tambourine, is the other front-runner, but the quiet intimacy of Moon edges that record’s spirited Muscle Shoals confidence.

This title track is the sixth of See You On the Moon‘s ten tracks I’ve featured on the blog, so that says a lot right there.

Three legged dog, remember when you brought him home.
He was talking to himself cause he’d always been alone.
April is a fine time, just thought you’d be around in June.
I guess we never really promised, but I’ll see you on the moon.

I’ll see you on the moon, where everyone is well,
And you never have to wait if you got a story to tell.
And way deep down inside, you always know just what to do,
When you’re flying all around up there on the moon.

When I was a little girl I was always coming round.
I haven’t really changed much. I’m just in a hurry now.
April is a fine time, but now I’m thinking about June.
We never really talked about it, but I’ll see you on the moon.

I’ll see you on the moon, where everyone is well,
And you never have to wait if you got a story to tell.
And way deep down inside, you always know just what to do,
When you’re flying all around up there on the moon.

Three legged dog, out there making a fuss.
I’m trying to get to sleep. It’s down to the two of us.
April is a fine time, just thought you’d be around for June.
I know we never really promised, but I’ll see on the moon.

I’ll see you on the moon, where everyone is well,
And you never have to wait if you got a story to tell.
And way deep down inside, you always know just what to do,
When you’re flying all around up there on the moon.

6 thoughts on “Song of the Day #1,859: ‘See You On the Moon’ – Tift Merritt

  1. Dana says:

    You should have slipped Tift a note with your blog address when you saw her perform live. I’m sure she would love to read these posts from arguably her number one fan.😄

    Beautiful song by the way.

  2. Amy says:

    🙂 Great idea, Dana. Honestly, he wouldn’t have even had to slip her a note. You probably could have just had a nice conversation about your blog.

    As for your National Ransom observation, it’s interesting how you can appreciate an album you don’t necessarily want to listen to frequently. Do we have those standards for books? Would a book have to be one you return to read over and over again in order to be worth a spot on your list? Or a film? Fascinating how music is the one art form we saddle with this additional burden – that it be something we can return to again and again… It’s not that I don’t agree with that criteria, but it does intrigue me.

    Meanwhile, this is a lovely song.

  3. Clay says:

    Good question, Amy.

    I think it boils down to the ease of entry for each medium. A book is a major time investment, and requires concentrated attention. A movie is a commitment of a couple of hours, but also requires concentrated attention.

    An album, on the other hand, usually runs less than an hour and can be listened to while doing other things — driving, especially, in my case.

    That means I spend a lot more time in the average week listening to music than reading books or watching movies. So music I can enjoy again and again gains in my estimation.

    I do think it’s similar for movies, in that when I look back at top ten lists past, the titles that I have revisited (or at the very least am eager to revisit) are the ones that have a better chance of remaining high on my list.

    • Amy says:

      I agree that the time investment is an important consideration, but I wonder if the fact that we can do so many other things while listening to music provides a fair environment in which to judge that music. Certainly if you’re driving alone in the car, that’s different. You are giving the music a tremendous amount of your attention, as all the other driving functions are, let’s hope, relatively automatic. On the other hand, if I’m listening while driving with my family – and we’re talking about all manner of things on the drive – has that song/album earned a fair listen? If someone was watching a film I loved while a) reading a book, b) tending to a work assignment, c) doing some light housework, or d) driving 😉 I would feel as if the film hadn’t been given a proper viewing.

      That said, I also think that music – and, to an extent, some films – ought to be able to be (though it needn’t always be) a communal experience. What is better than a sing along at a concert, for instance. When everyone is the audience knows – and shares – their love and appreciation for the song. In a movie theater, the collective gaspe or applause during a spectacular sequence in an action film is part of the fun.

  4. pegclifton says:

    I agree that it’s easier to revisit film and music due to the commitment a book takes. The books that I have truly loved I have not read twice, I just keep recommending them to others and that is not true of films. This is a lovely song; I’m wondering has the person in her life died or left her?

  5. Clay says:

    Yes, this song was written about a friend who died.

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